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institute. up next, will continue our "america by the numbers" series. the future of u.s. energy production in 2014. we will be joined by adam sieminski and frank verrastro. >> i think writers institute is something that is very important within the culture. we are a culture of words, of voices. words are key to our imagination, our capacity to invasion -- envision things. we ourselves are not completely tied to print on the page, but there is no other art forms so readily accessible other than perhaps film, which we work with, too. there is something in literature that just captures the human spirit. >> this weekend, joined "book tv" and "american history tv" as we look at the historic and literary life of new york's capital, albany. >> the chiefs of staff had to make the plan for the invasion of japan without considering the atomic bomb. it was estimated it would cost 700,000. >> i choose to honor both, both the sacrifice of american servicemen fighting their way to the pacific and of a little girl who died as a result of an atomic bombing. it is unimaginable but that must of been like --
americany: -- mr. mcnerney: this morning i rise about two things i care passionately about. wind energy and veterans. i spent more than 20 years in the wind industry as a technology development engineer. in those days we saw some spectacular failures and dramatic failures, but every year we put more into the technology development. little bit this year in the aerodynamics, gear box, foundation, every year a little incremental improvement in the control systems, field testing so we understood what was going on and the power electronics, and today we have an industry that is a spectacular industry. . the touchins produce power for five cents per kilowatt. it's been a successful business. the united states dominated that business because of consistent policies, consistent tax policies. we could rely on the policies being there year after year. investors came in, engineers came in. in the early 1980's those policies began to change and the technology began to leave our country and we've seen -- i've seen in my career the incentives come and go over the years. i can tell you it's devastating
business with key sectors in the iranian economy, with energy and ship building and shipping and the ports, this amendment that would shut down businesses that are involved in sectors which fund the proliferation activities of iran and that regime is crucial. in addition, the amendment is going to prohibit business with all designated persons connected to the iranian government. it bans trades and commodities used in these key sectors and used to stop iran from receiving payment in gold or using oil payments in local currency then to buy gold and we have to stop an effort to water down these sanctions. i say that because i remember the votes in the past. i remember our effort on the central bank. it was only because we got unanimous votes because we got so much support that we were able to deploy those. but let me add that there is another portion of the amendment here that targets the regime for their human rights abuses. and i think one of the areas where we've been short, for those of you who have talked to to those in the prison there and experienced the torture, who have seen the murd
. with respect to health care costs and energy costs. and then i think it will create the conditions under which businesses will be able to create a renaissance of american competitors. i think that is a brilliant agenda. i think we have agreed that as the distinguished alumnus of harvard said washington as a town with northern charm and southern efficiency. let's assume we go through the fiscal cliff. immigration, corporate tax reform, and investments. emigration, you're not doing the dramatic. vietor due to comprehensive immigration but we did not have a chance to do it. both wings cayman decided it would sabotage it. maybe republicans learned the lesson but i am not sure how much of a lesson. the way that was financed was through the corporate tax increase but there -- that had people on both sides will in to work with the white house and congress. when you talk about infrastructure spending and investments in things we have done with nih, all the talk now is about death. >-- how do you do what the ambitious and admirable the agenda envisions? >> will have the discussion of the debt ceiling a
for her dict and someone who has stepped up when it comes to energy issues in the ohio delegation, specifically on re-enriching uranium. our navy relies on uranium and jean made it a point to fight for a domestic source to power aircraft carriers and submarines. without a reliable source of fuel, the navy wouldn't be able to protect the homeland or fight abroad but not only that, jean has been a voice of fiscal responsibility in her time in congress and i wish her the best going forward. my colleague betty sutton, i want to thank her for her service to ohio and the nation. we had a hard fought and extremely competitive campaign. throughout it, she maintained a level of professionalism and integrity not often seen in american politics. i want to thank her for her service and i wish her the best of work with her future endeavors. last but not least, my friend steve latourette who has been a friend, a guide, a trusted confidant and someone who i have looked to as a mentor. he and i both strongly supported a couple of issues, development of fuel cell technology through the solid state
on energy and manufacturing and research, deeply about whether he will help nih push us to the next frontiers of alzheimer's and other important biomedical research," and then say, "it is not really my business, i am not a budget%, to worry about whether we are pending on our discretionary budget." what i have to say to folks is that you cannot pretend you care deeply about innovation and research and investing in early childhood and investing in science and stem education if you are indifferent to whether or not we reduce our budget deficit by simply taking deeper and deeper cuts in domestic discretionary budget. at some point you skip to a point where you are simply treating of between -- trading off between early to childhood and biomedical research and higher education. those are not trade-offs the american public wants us to make. when we talk about getting our fiscal discipline, our fiscal house in order, i want to remind people that when i was here in the early 1990's, one of the clarion calls, one of the reasons people make that case, was that if we had expanding deficits, i
know, they have staffs and they work at it aggressive plea. i'm older and i have less energy. so that makes it harder. >> and tell us something about the obama white house that we don't know. >> what does obama think of mitt romney? what does he really think? and i think he feels that romney is incompetent because he didn't run a better campaign. and i suspect that one of the themes in all the coverage of the campaign is going to be romney never found a way to -- either the method or the theme of how to run against obama. whereas they thought it was going to be easy. >> we're about to give the hook here. what is the one thing you would like to know about president obama that you don't? >> oh, i did ask him this. i didn't put it in the book. he keeps a diary. and so i'd like to have access. [laughter] >> assume that's for -- >> do you keep a diary? yes. not on all this detailed kind of -- let's see it. so that's going to -- i'm sure he will write a really interesting memoir. >> what did he tell you about the diary? >> that it existed. no detail. he didn't offer any of it or read f
, alexander hamilton, observe energy is a leading character in good government. the president must lead in a divided government and must not advocate his or her responsibility. president obama has the responsibility to propose a real bipartisan plan to avert the fiscal cliff that can pass both the house and the senate. withdrawing from the recommendations of the simpson- bowles commission, the president could propose a plan that would not only avert the so-called fiscal cliff, but also help us avert the yawning fiscal of this ivory for me -- it this goal -- fiscal abyss. if president obama were to offer such a plan, republicans would act favorably. going over the cliff is unnecessary. as it has been observed in "the wall street journal," the president is boxing in the republicans. he is offering them a deal they cannot accept. first, the president has repeatedly called for a balanced solution involving both revenue and less spending. what is obvious to the most casual observer is that this plan is not a balanced. the fiscal cliff involves nearly four dollars of anticipated revenue from
in energy and commerce. thank you for your service and friendship. it is hard to go through this list. mr. miller, this is a wonderful privilege to say thank you, the countless hours that you could add up for the service to constituents and the tremendous leadership within this body and these members who have given their all and will not be back at the 113th. it's important to say their names and to honor them and give them credit for what they have done. joe baca has been a fixture for the central valley and agriculture, someone who has agriculture number one in my district as well. but there is much to remember joe baca for and his contributions in agriculture and the financial services committee as well. my colleague, former colleague, bob filner, who has already assumed another position within our government, as mayor of san diego. i think of bob filner and i think of veterans' issues and he was a college professor before he came to congress, as my husband was and reached out to each other in that capacity. he has worked hard on veterans' issues. i have 50,000 veterans in my district.
of organizations that have come to the floor on this bill to oppose it. the committee, energy and commerce committee, heard expert medical testimony that primatene mist is not safe or recommended for treating asthma. we have a chart here. these are the groups that opposed this bill. i urge you to vote no. the lung association, thoracic society, american academy of pediatrics, asthma and allergy foundation. all the people involved in health are saying they don't want this drug on the market. it will only confuse asthma patients. it is not the safest drug that they could have. the gentleman from texas has said, take it off the market. it is off the market. it hasn't been taken off because of safety. but it is not recommended by the medical community. there is another group here called the alliance for responsible atmospheric polcy. i would like to indicate some of the organization that is are part of that alliance. some of the major corporations in this country. i want to show a chart of those who are in favor of this bill. armstrong pharmaceuticals. the one company that will benefit from th
committee i wanted to serve on, i thought, ok, i'll get what i need. i told him i wanted energy and commerce. and he chewed on his cigar and he said, you'll get ed and labor and you'll like. it but jack was a great leader and role model. he supported civil rights bills, refused to sign the southern manifesto in 19 of a an helped write the historical civil rights act. may we also remember congressman jack brooks. he was a great man, a political figure, a u.s. marine veteran and a friend that i'll never forget. thank you, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: thank you. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. poe: ask unanimous consent to address how it's for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. poe: mr. speaker, starting at the age of 15, i worked any job i could find to support myself throughout college. manually dug ditches, construction work, plant work. after college i found an entry-level position in the field in which i sturdied. and with hard work i have constantly been employed for 36 years
in the western hemisphere and produces 1/4 of the country's energy supply, we refuse to abandon the world's most important financial and commercial center. instead we must improve the resiliency of our communities, environment and essential services and vulnerable populations with smart planning and well-designed recovery and rebuilding tools. we have the ability to reduce the consequences of severe weather. by mitigating flood risk through smarter land use guidelines, building codes and flood protection improvements. the state of new york has requested $9 billion for mitigation measures from the administration. the state of new jersey is seeking another $7 billion for the same purpose. i commend governor quomeow and governor christie for -- cuomo and governor christie for including strategic needs in their funding request. both of these leaders have demonstrated inble compassion and concern for the people who they represent and have been highly effective in their leadership since the disaster began and it may also include mayor bloomberg, mayor booker and many other local officials that stepped
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12